8 NEW YEARS RESOLUTION FOR ALL MUSICIANS.

(NO 6 WILL DEFINITELY AMAZE YOU. IT HAS BEEN TESTED).

The New Year is already here, a year that anything is possible. Everything is possible. So, the perfect time to make some musical resolutions is Now! Because a resolution is a personal commitment to work toward a change you wish to see in yourself or in the world. This change is translated into a goal and then a plan with measurable results.

Setting goals will give you focus and motivation as you continue to improve your craft as a musician. However, we know that setting goals for the whole year can be tough, so here are 10 New Year’s Resolutions for Musicians from ages 5 to adults.

  • Create a Practice Routine

It’s not as easy as it sounds to get into a practice routine. Often, we try, but life activities are enough to distracts anyone, and practice falls on the back burner. Set a goal this year to make your practice routine a priority.

To your best capability, map out your schedule in this year and find a space of time that you can devote to practice. Once you’ve decided on a time, you need to treat it like you would any other commitment (school, work, etc.).

Put your practice time in your calendar to avoid scheduling conflicts.

Getting into a routine is essential for progress in your music. You’ll eliminate opportunities for backsliding and promote faster growth and learning retention.

  • Create a Proper Warm-Up

We’re all guilty of ditching our warm-up routine from time to time (or most of the time). However, warming up before getting into practices and performances can prevent serious injury, build up strength, and improve your overall skill and fluency. This year, resolve to come up with a 10 – 15-minute warm-up that you never skip! If you don’t want to do the exact same thing every day, come up with a few variations, and stick to them!

  • Start Taking Lessons, or Start Again!

There are so many benefits to having a music teacher. If you’re not happy with your progress or coming to dead ends with online resources, maybe this year is the year to get an instructor or join the online one on one music lessons via zoom with www.giovannimusicacademy.com

Our music teacher will;

  1. Hold you accountable
  2. Give you an individualized approach to your practice
  3. Answer specific questions
  4. Troubleshoot problems
  5. Open new doors to musical ideas
  6. Help you stay committed

Ask around your community and take the time to find the perfect teacher for you. Once you’ve found your match, honor your commitment, and we promise you’ll see a significant difference in your playing or singing!

  • Setlists and Song Lists 

A setlist, playlist, and song list are pretty much the same thing. A wonderful resolution for musicians is to set a goal to learn a certain number of songs from top to bottom. Every student I teach starts with a 5-song list. We do not add songs until all five songs are done. When those five are accomplished, we celebrate and then make a new list. This process is very important: Set the goal. Work toward the goal. Achieve the goal. Celebrate the achievement. Wash, rinse, repeat.

When it comes to resolutions, we can be ultra-specific. Try these examples: 

  1. One song a week for 12 weeks 
  2. One solo a month for 3 months played along with the recording 
  3. Twelve songs for the year 

Think of your own resolution that’s relevant to your goals, and write it out. Look at it and try to make it as specific and measurable as possible.

  • Organization 

The new year is the best time to get organized. Enough of getting all your music materials untidy. Stay organize could mean different things to everyone, but for music students, it can be broken down into a few categories: 

A. Equipment 

Students should set a resolution to organize their equipment. This could pertain to how they will take care of things, put things away, and where accessories will be stored. 

B. Material 

C. Lyrics, Chords, Tabs, Lead Sheets, Sheet Music 

Whether it is in a binder, a tablet, or a cloud-based software like Google Drive or Dropbox, this is the time to get those items in one place, in order, and prioritized.

  • Compose Original Music

If you’re the type that never composed original music before, give it a try this year! Whether it’s an instrumental composition or more along the singer/songwriter route, composing is a great credit to add to your musical portfolio! Composing your own original music gives you motivation to have confidence in yourself.

However, If you’re already a songwriter, give yourself a number of new songs to write this year. A few options could be

  1. 5 Songs in a Year
  2. 10 Songs in a Year
  3. 1 Song per Month
  4. 2 Songs per Month
  5. 1 Song per Week

According to research, songwriting is a great way to let go of some stress and deal with emotions. It’s a sort of therapy for musicians. Challenge yourself to finish your songs once you’ve started, and be proud of your work.

  • Try Perform at an Open Mic or before Friends and Family
A teenage boy sings in musical theatre class

Do you struggle with stage fright? It’s time to conquer it!

First, let me tell you that it is completely normal to have stage freight, and nearly every musician deal with it to some degree. But the best way to lift some anxiety is to perform as many times as possible. You have to get used to crowds, making mistakes on stage, and staying level-headed through the nerves.

Open mic nights are a great way to break into the performance world. Usually taking place at bars or coffee shops, musicians of all skill levels come to perform both covers and original music. Whether you’re an instrumentalist or vocalist, these types of environments typically involve many people shuffling around, ordering drinks or food, and having conversations during the performances. While people will be watching, it’s not the type of place where the crowd is going to notice a mistake or two. It’s also a great place experiment with new songs if you’re a songwriter!

If you want to take your performing to the next level, try booking some gigs this year. Start small at coffee shops, restaurants, or bars and perhaps by the end of the year, you’ll be selling out performance venues!

  • Go to An Audition

Sometimes being a musician can be a little scary. The competition to succeed is fierce, and so you will have moments on your musical journey where you really have to put yourself out there. Maybe this is your year to try, and you can start by going to an audition!

Auditions are great for conquering stage fright, receiving constructive feedback, and ultimately granting you access to brand new experiences. You never know what part you might land or what show you’ll end up in. And even if you don’t always get the end result you hope for, you’ll meet a lot of wonderful people along the way (and possibly many industry professionals as well).

Shot of a young man using his phone and headphones in a dance studio

There are a lot of things to keep in mind when it comes to auditioning, so for further help check out these articles on www.giovannimusciacademy.com/

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